Dego Considers ‘The Negative Positive’ On Upcoming New Album

The legendary Dego is back next week with a new album, ‘The Negative Positive’.

It will be released on April 30 on vinyl and digitally via his own 2000black imprint which specialises in music from the African diaspora that crosses genre bounds.

‘The Negative Positive’ fuses techno, funk, boogie and more over its nine tracks, showcasing exactly why Dego is renowned as an innovator and boundary pusher. The album showcases two vocal features, firstly with Nadine Charles on ‘This Is A Message To You’, then with new 2000black signing Samii on ‘Recovered Memories’.

Dego recently released a four-track collaborative EP with Matt Lord, ‘Lord & dego’, which was released earlier this month.

Listen to single ‘The Disclaimer’ below, and preorder the album here.

New Music: Pioneering Broken Beat Legend, Dego Announces New Album for September

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Dego’s contribution to the UK underground music scene has spanned over 20 years, with his earlier productions in to jungle and drum and bass, eventually leading him to experimenting with house and developing that broken beat sound. But Dego has never been bound of any genre, taking on a range of influences throughout his career, from Jazz, Hip Hop, to Techno and house but always with an element of soul.

Dego’s third studio album titled, Too Much will be released through is very own 2000 Black Label on the 6th September. With a number of British singers featuring on the album from Nadine Charles, Sarina Leah, and Sharlene Hector to name a few, we can probably expect a combination of funk, soul and broken beats.

Check out the first track from the album, A Strong Move for Truth. Let us know what you think, and pre-order the album:

Tracklist:

1. A Strong Move for Truth (feat. Nadine Charles)
2. Good Morning (feat. Samii)
3. Remini Dream (feat. Ivana Santilli)
4. I Don’t Wanna Know (feat. Obenewa)
5. Unknown Faults
6. Life Can Be Unreal (feat. Sarina Leah)
7. Too Much (feat. Sharlene Hector)
8. You Are Virgo
9. Come of Age
10. Just Leave It (feat. Lady Alma)
11. Ogawa Okasan Said Just Play
12. A Where Pringle Deh
13. My Standards Are (Not) Too High

First Thoughts: Kaidi Tatham – It’s A World Before You

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Multi- Instrumentalist, and immensely experienced electronic producer Kaidi Tatham delivered a special full length 13 track long album, titled; ‘It’s a world before you’. There’s a feeling of beckoning with the arrival of this album, having already teased us with two EPs with First Word Records titled ‘The Hard Times’ and ‘Changing Times’. Kaidi Tatham will be best known for his work as part of the London based DJ collective ‘Bugz in the Attic’ from the early 2000s who were pivotal for broken beat evolution throughout London. More recently as well as solo projects he collaborated with Dego to bring a full-length album with Theo Parrish’s Sound signature; titled, ‘A So We Gwarn’.

 

With broken beats heavily embedded throughout the album, the infusion of many other influences are what distinguishes Kaidi Tatham’s diverse, quality taste. ‘Its About Who Know’ is layered with a offbeat hats and kicks showing hints of old school RnB rhythms, whilst the bubbling synthesised piano melody and percussion showcase Kaidi wicked skills in arrangement and on the keys. ‘Cupid’ features American lyricist; Uhmeer, who’s quick quirky word play excellently takes center stage to Kaidi’s classic hip-hop stylised production, with hints of his own touches with the vibrant keyboard chords.

On the other hand, stand out track ‘Out Here On My Own’ featuring Manchester’s rising duo ‘Children of Zeus’, downtempo resonating gentle instrumentals accompanied by Tyler’s vocals and Konny Kon lyrics lift the track, and provides a contemplative soulful element to a complete body of work. A truly inspiring body of work, which I feel represents a very pure uplifting scene in UK underground music which needs more appreciation.

You can support and buy copy of Kaidi Tatham’s work via bandcamp below:

You can also see his debut live performance with Dego at The jazz café and buy a ticket here

LIVE: Speaking In Sound, Something London Needs More Of

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This photo is courtesy of Touching Bass

Nestled in the cosy humble space; Brilliant Corners, took place the Touching Bass crew’s following ‘Speaking in Sound’ session with Dego. Touching Bass consider themselves to be ‘soul disciples’, aiming to forward black-oriented music with soul, through discussion and music. They’re a collective whose movements and key message resonates’ well with inspired sound. At a time, where London’s creative culture is being disrupted with growing gentrification in some areas, and with creativity through music and arts being important for many young generations’ in London. It’s important London has collectives like Touching Bass; to stimulate and showcase the foundations of music and creativity in London. It’s what makes these “Speaking in Sound” sessions so unique, and, to have a wonderfully talented musician like Dego there, could do nothing but inspire.

Words such as visionary and forward-thinker, have been ushered under Dego’s name. Those familiar with his work, wont be quick to disagree with those labels. But those who are not familiar with his work, should know Dego has been meticulously producing music for over 20 years. Growing up in a household amongst many reggae, hip hop, jazz records, he sights in the interview – it was from those sounds, which laid the foundations for his early interests and work. However, with the dance music scene growing steadily in the 1990s, be fittingly, his first releases were heavily influenced by DnB, jungle, and later; techno. Which he produced as part of the 4hero dance collective movement in 1990s. His later work in 2000s, led to the resurrection of his 2000BLACK label, which gained popular acclaim and seemed to carve out a niche sound, with a concoction of house, techno and jazz. Some people view the early 2000s as the rise of the “broken beat” style production in the London scene, led by Dego amongst others.

This photo is for promotional use only

 Anyway, anyone who’s been to Brilliant corners, will understand how sonically gifting the venue is. It’s a very contemplative and unassuming venue, with beautifully vibrant moon-shaped lanterns hanging down from the ceiling. The session Comfortably accommodated 50-60 people, with chairs ideally arranged in semi-circle shaped rows, and a cosy cushioned seating area, adding to the ambience and collective feel of the event. The evening began with Touching bass’ very own Alex Rita showing off her latest collection of records, her groovy afro influenced records settled listeners easily, as her selection, seemed as intricately selected, as her blending. What followed of course, was the main discussion with the man himself; Dego.
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This photo is courtesy of Briliant Corners

It’s difficult to go in much detail of the discussion itself, as I wouldn’t want to miss paraphrase anything.  But hearing Dego answering questions so unapologetically, and honestly was encouraging. Having never seen Dego perform live before, but having been an appreciative listener of his work, it was finally nice to put a face to his music. Dego warmed into the discussion and grew in confidence, as he spoke more freely and comfortably as time went on. Discussing topics around the inspiration for each of his albums, his main influencers growing up, and generally his journey to where he is now. It was a very light-hearted discussion, and although he’s a respected and revered character by some, it was easy to warm to him. In a lot of cases, when you go to a music event, there’s always a slight barrier between you and the artist you’re seeing, but these open discussion, help to pull away those barriers. It allows enthusiastic creatives to ask questions, and pick the mind of someone with a lot more experience within the industry. It invokes a more meaningful sense of inspiration.

Anyway, as time went, everyone began to respond well to Dego’s casual, nonchalant manner, and the number of questions asked from audience, meant we ended going over time! Nevertheless, as promised, Dego still had the energy to show off some of his vast record collection. Once the lights dimmed down, we were treated to some beautiful old soulful, jazz and disco records, mostly from the 80s and 90s. There were some hints of more broken beat tracks which had inspired some of his own productions in the early 2000s, and which earned him the label; “icon” (as Errol respectfully referred to Dego as, in the introduction). Dego was quick to humbly reject that notion, and rather funnily reiterated that, at the end of his discussion. It was a lovely, immersive experience involving discussion, as well as music. It’s the kind of unique experience London needs more of, as there’s a lot of inspiration to find from artists’ such as Dego, and I look forward to the next session.

Check out the Touching Bass Afro chronicles Volume one: https://touching-bass.bandcamp.com/album/tb-afro-chronicles-volume-one